Monday, July 2, 2012

Behavior Charts: Advice/Comments Welcome!

I question my methods often, as I think all good educators should.  So, if you have a minute please read this LONG post and leave some honest feedback and advice on what works for YOU.


Last year was a tough one (behaviorally) in my classroom.  I felt I had more defiance, anger and "issues" come up than I ever have before.  Actually it seems every year gets a little tougher.  I've taught for 14 years and in the last 2 years I've had to chase down runaway kids, been spit at, screamed at, scratched and had to have many, many, many talks about why it is not ok to hurt others.


So, I'm spending my summer trying to prepare myself for next year.  If the pattern holds I need to be ready.  I want my kinders to have a great year. . .it's their first and I need to be at my best for them and their parents who might be sending their first (or last) child through kindergarten.  They deserve a stress free environment, right?   I'll share with you what I've done for years and then ask my question.


I've always had a "Behavior Management" system.  Whether it's been "move your card" or "move your picture" or "move your clip."  The overall idea was always the same: 
1.  You make a bad choice
2.  You lose 5-10 minutes of _____ (free time, recess, computer time, etc)
3.  Think about the "choice" that put you in this "time out"
4. When "time out" is over we'll discuss what choices where made and what you could do differently next time

And I can honestly say that, out of a class of 24 last year, there were 12 kids who had to repeat this process over and over and over and over.  Sigh. 

Here's my chart from last year.  

Also, I think it's important to understand that the consequences part of my classroom management is not all I do.  

We have a "Pond of Choice" for conflict resolution. (Love this by the way!  If you want to know more click the picture to go to the website.)


We talk about above the line/below the line behavior (Top 20 Training:  Great training and I love this too and use it alot!)

I've read Ruby Payne's book A Framework for Understanding Poverty.  I understand the need to teach "those are your home rules"  and "these are your school rules"  
Great book by the way!


We read stories about appropriate behavior.  We talk about what appropriate vs. inappropriate behavior looks like, how it affects everyone, what we can do to build a better community, and on and on and on.  Love Julia Cook. . .  she is FaNtAsTiC!

We talk about Warm Fuzzies/Cold Prickles and try to fill our Warm Fuzzy jar for a class reward.

We read Have You Filled a Bucket Today? 

We role play, practice "redos", I sing my songs, chant my chants, do my little dance, weave my magic over their beautiful 5 and 6 year old minds and still:

**Bobby finds it ok to scratch Sally and draw blood because she touched his pencil**

**Billy thinks it's ok to yell at me because his shoe is untied**

**Susie runs out of the building and tries to hide because she doesn't want to go to music**


**Jenny screeches (yes, screeches!) at the class that life is not fair and she hates us all.**


Well, you get the point.  Even after hours, days, weeks, months spent working on positive productive behavior kids still make bad choices, mistakes, errors, learning opportunities. . . whatever you want to call them.


  And isn't it our job, as their teacher, to help them learn from their choices?


So, finally, here's where my question comes in:
The BEHAVIOR CHART
Some say they are not necessary and only "embarass" the kids.
Some say "keep it" and lots are even using this more positive version I've seen all over pinterest and blogs:

What do you think?  I can see both points of view. I really can.  I don't want to embarrass the kids but I do want them to stop and think about their behavior because how else are they going to learn from it?  
I believe (even if it is controversial) that kids need consequences for hurtful/inappropriate behavior (that might be a post for another day!)


Do you "keep track" of inappropriate behavior?
If so, how?
If not, what do you do?












47 comments:

  1. I kept a star chart on my clip board this last year, but I am moving to the clip chart next year. I plan to hang it inside my cabinet so it is not public. If I have a child that has repeated behavior problems, I would conference with parents and make a special discipline plan or refer to support team for help. I do not inform parents about behavior daily. If there is not a note, they had a good day, if I write a note, that means I need them to talk to their child. Discipline has gotten harder.
    Jennifer
    kindertrips

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    1. Thanks Jennifer! I like the idea of keeping the chart but making it "less public." That sounds like a good compromise...I can still keep track visually (which I need) and the kids still have accountability for their actions (which they need).
      Great idea! Thank you!

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  2. I have a card chart on the wall. They go from green to yellow, orange,and red. Starting last year I gave kids the chance to get "back on green" if they'd pulled their cards to yellow. If they went further than that the had a chance to improve too, just by putting one card back. I found that very helpful with my first graders who were so overwhelmed by pulling one card that they felt there was no point in trying to do better. I think allow the chance to put a card back really helped with the embarrassment factor too.
    I hope it helps to know that you are definitely not the only one who feels that children are changing and discipline is getting harder.
    _Chrissy
    First Grade Found Me

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    1. Thanks Chrissy! I like the idea of 2nd chances. I agree that most give up once their card is moved...especially when they reach red. It definitely helps to know that we're not alone in our belief that discipline is getting harder. It does make me wonder why though?
      Thanks for your thoughts! I really appreciate it!

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  3. Hi, we use PBIS at our school and it seems to work out really well since there are school wide expectations. I use a card system as well, but just as Chrissy does my students earn the chance to move back up.
    By the way, I awarded you the Versatile Blogger Award. Please stop by and pick it up. Also, I would love to have you link up to my "Blogs of Inspiration" page as well.
    Happy Teaching,
    Laura
    TIPS: Teach, Inspire, and Prepare Students

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    1. I'll have to look into what PBIS is. I haven't heard of that before. I like the idea of a school wide system though. It is getting so important to build community in schools! Thanks for the award! I'm heading over to check out your linky right now!

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  4. I have used a clip chart all 8 years of my teaching and I really like it. It's not perfect and it doesn't always work so well with the *trying* students, but overall it's been the best fit for me. My kids also get the change to move their clip back up (which I didn't do my first 2 years) and that has made a big difference. Almost as soon as they have to move their clip down for something, they start getting it together and asking me if they improve can they move their clip up. We also do PBIS and any of my kids who end the day above the green (ready to learn) get a "caught being good" that goes to the office and at the end of the week the principal draws names out and they get a little prize. I do have to do a behavior report daily for parents, because I teach in a small town where everyone knows each other and the parents would call me at home if I didn't send what color they end up on each day! Good luck in deciding what you want to do :)
    Vickie

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    1. Thanks for your thoughts Vickie! I have a daily behavior report also (ditto on the small town!) It's nice to hear other educators say they are doing a lot of the same things I am. Makes me feel better about the choices I'm making for my class! Thank you!

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  5. I hear you sister! I have seen an increase in bad choices over the past few years in my classroom. I know that it isn't me because I can hear the teachers through our CONCRETE walls and I pray that they don't hear me! I have also gone through an array of behavior plans and each one works to some extent, but not on those repeat offenders. I had one of my first graders suspended a total of 29 days this year because as soon as the kid came back to school, it only took about 2 hours for the chaos to begin. 2 years ago I got so mad at my class that I took my very expensive behavior pocket chart down and cut it into little pieces in front of them, while yelling "no behavior chart means no fun for the rest of the year). Not a good thing when it was January.

    I am going to try the chart that you mentioned that we see all over Pinterest and on other blogs. In fact, my grade level is going to try to use it so we can really make an educated decision on whether it works or not. Nothing else has.

    Good Luck!

    faithfulinfirst.blogspot.com

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    1. Oh Janine...I loved your comment! You made me laugh and shout "AMEN!" in my head all at the same time!! And I had a great visual of you cutting up that pocket chart! : ) I have had sooo many moments like that! I love the honesty!

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  6. When I had my first elementary class, everybody had to do a color chart. When I left that school, I knew I didn't want to ever have a color chart. There are so many reasons to not have a color chart. One being, the children begin attributing behaviors to certain colors. They might stop liking a color! At my first school, we actually had black as a color too and our student population was 90% African American. Currently, I don't have a chart at all. Have you heard of Love and Logic? Do you do home visits at your school? At the last two schools I have worked at (one of them being my current school), we do home visits to get an idea of what life is like for children so when bobby yells that life isn't fair, you know why. Love & Logic is natural consequences. The kids all just want attention regardless of how they get it. Often times I would just ignore some of the things they did. In my class, initially a child is removed from an activity. Before he or she is allowed to return, I have a chat to find out if he or she knows what they did. If a child has done something that requires a longer chat, they usually stay in for part of the recess. Honestly, sometimes they want the one-on-one too. Sometimes, I have the kids help clean up or they wipe down tables or put up chairs, etc. So rather than just sitting there, they're doing something. They're 'paying back' the time they wasted so to speak. Rather than reacting when a child has said or done something, you want to have a flat affect and say something like..uh-oh..or oh no, that's too bad, or what a bummer..because the kids want to get a reaction out of us!

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    1. I have heard of Love and Logic! It is a great program! Thank you so much for leaving your comment! It's so clear you love your job and your students! They are super lucky to have you!

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  7. I am a big believer in pulling from many resources what works best for you. Like Laura, I am at a PBIS school (in fact, we are at the same one :)) I also believe some of the core aspects of Love and Logic - especially regarding natural consequences. I used to have a point system where I had to keep track of the points the kids did or did not earn. I hada tracking chart that was displayed in the classroom for all to see. Gradually though, I began to rethink my approach. I took the tracking chart down after school one day. One of my administrators had come into the room, saw the chart, and yelled at a child who was not having a good day. What she didn't know was that his issues had been in the morning, he got himself together and had been doing well the rest of the day. When I saw the look on his face (totally bewildered because at that moment, he was working cooperatively with a partner and then totally humiliated because everyone was looking at him.) I knew what I was doing was ineffective at best and perhaps even harmful at worst. Since then I've used a variety of tracking methods - some years keeping track on a clipboard, some years giving rewards daily and not tracking, and sometimes I've even gone back to a classroom chart. (I did make a few changes. 1. It is not smack dab in the front of the room. 2. Studnts know that they can move back if their choices improve. I do not move a student the first time they make a wrong choice (I know there are a lot of people who disagree with that, but it works for me.) My basic philosophy is this: Discipline means to teach, not punish. In PBIS, the one part I think it crtical is the pre-teachin of rules and procedues. We do "What it Look Like" and "What it Sounds Like" charts at the beginning of the year. We role play. We have discssions. Then, when our expectations and procedures are posted, I incorporate some of the descriptions with the rules. (Eg.: I will be a learner. is our expectation. I added below the rule the following: Learners...look at the speaker, ask questions when they don't understand, keep their minds on their learning...etc. I expect my students to learn from their mistakes. I use a lot of natural consequences (Eg.: "I understand that you would like to go to your next center. As soon as your work is done from this center,you may rejoin your group." or "I agree that sitting by yourself at lunch is no fun. When I see and hear that I can trust you to use kind words with your classmates, you can rejoin them.") INSTEAD of moving them down on the chart. Most of my students thrive with this approach. For the ones that need more support, I have the time to really focus on them since I am not always tracking points and minor misbehaviors.

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    1. Great insight Amy! That story about your admin getting upset with the child is a good example of how the charts are too public. I totally agree with pre-teaching kids EVERYTHING! I used to think "jeez...all kids should know this!" but now my thinking is "all kids need to know this so let's practice." It made a big difference in my teaching and how I approach classroom management. Thanks for your thoughts! I really appreciate you taking the time to leave them!

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  8. Totally agree that there has to be consequences for inappropriate behavior. I am also a big believer that kids need to be rewarded for good behavior more often than most regular ed (I'm special ed) do. One of the things I have seen work is having a classroom stuffed animal that leaves notes and goes home with students randomly when they are "caught" being good or improving on something you asked them to work on. To encourage a strong community vibe in the classroom we have a system where the class can earn a letter every time the class is working well together, gets a compliment in the hall, etc. We use the word "Respect", but you could use any word. When the class has earned all of the letters (we hang them in the front of the room as we earn them) then they get a class reward. The reward could be anything that works for you: bonus recess, Popsicles, no homework that night, etc.
    It does seem that kids are coming with less and less school behaviors. It can be frustrating when we have to take so much time out of teaching to deal with it. Good luck!!

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    1. Thank you so much for leaving a comment. Rewards vs. bribes is another hot topic right now. I might have to approach that question next...it's a good discussion point with lots of different opinions/approaches.

      I personally agree with you...I like it when the kids work towards a goal/reward together. I like seeing them build each other up
      and get excited when they succeed!

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    2. Here is another way to look at the rewards vs bribes debate.... Most people wouldn't get up to go into their job every day all day long without being paid to do so. For kids, school is their job and they deserve a "paycheck" of sorts. Everyone is rewarded for many things throughout their day and lives- we just don't always stop to think about it. You are rewarded by driving safe by not getting a ticket, getting discounts on insurance, etc.

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    3. I think you and I would get along just fine! I swear it's like you read my mind! I also think that we, as adults, do the right thing b/c we've learned from our experiences. You're absolutely right...I drive safe for the rewards of the insurance discounts and b/c I know I could hurt others or myself if I don't. Kids don't get that last part yet (they don't have the life experience we do) but they do get the reward part of it so rewarding is a way to reinforce appropriate behavior at their level.

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  9. i have used a chart forever! it is made from library pockets. Each child has a pocket with a white smiley card, and then behind it a pink, orange and yellow card. The chart is behind my desk. If they keep their smile - they get a sticker - a collection of 20 stickers is a trip to the prize box. Kids get random stickers through the day too, for making good choices, or helping other students etc. if they misbehave - they lose their smile card and move to pink. If they misbehave again, they get another card and at playtime, they get to sit with me and think about it etc...

    This worked for me for years and years, but for some reason unknown to me, I had such a fantastic class this year that I never one time pulled a single card. I think I just kept my kids so engaged and focused so hard on the positive, combined with the sheer luck of having an amazing group of students, it was just great.

    I am actually thinking of NOT doing the cards this year and see how it goes. From what you said, it sounds like you ARE doing all the right things, and have had some bad luck. Maybe this year will be better (hug)

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    1. Bless you for leaving that sweet comment! I hope I'm doing all the right things. After 14 years I'm still trying to perfect it. I guess as educators we never stop learning and changing. It's so great to read all these comments from other educators and read about their experiences. So glad you had a good class this year...it makes teaching so much more fun!

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  10. Hi Michelle! My good years are like leap year...they come every 4 years! This last year was an awesome year and I hated to see my little ones go. My campus has a campus-wide system so as the child moves up, the parents already know what is expected...but what I might pull a child's clip for may not be what another teacher may pull their clip for. So it's still a broken system. We used the rainbow chart like the ones seen from Pintrest. If a child got on blue (the "outstanding" behavior) 5 times, then they got a "bronze" clip, eventually the goal being a "gold" clip. I found this worked because the students had the chance to redeem themselves if they had to move down the chart and I have to say they worked hard! But I can't say that will work next year. Something I implemented at the end of the year because the students were getting a little summer crazy was what I call "beat the teacher". If they could walk in the halls quietly they got a point but if I had to redirect then I got the point. If they could get through a lesson without a lot of redirection, then they got a point...so on. The last 10 minutes of the day I would give them a little reward like a favorite song or a few minutes of an educational video so I could get their folders done (we report to parents daily). This worked because they loved beating me. If I won the points and had more than the class at the end of the day...my reward was 10 minutes of quiet time. :) I hope I make sense with this post...my thoughts kept getting interrupted and I ramble. :) Good luck with the upcoming school year!

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    1. My name is Stephanie by the way...I posted anonymous because I am new to the blogging scene and don't have an account...

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    2. So glad you left a comment Stephanie! I like you're Leap Year Theory! : ) Thanks for your take on the clip system. I hadn't heard the "gold" clip version yet. That's a fun touch and what a fun/easy thing for the kids to work for! I do a variation of your hallway pts. also. We play almost the exact same game you do in that they get/lose pts. for hallway behavior. If they win they get to see me do 10 push-ups or jumping jack and if I win they have to do the push-ups, etc. They try REALLY hard to win because they like to watch me "struggle" with the push-ups! I like that you carry the game throughout the day and they get an end of they day reward for winning. Thanks again for your comments and I'm glad you're joining the blogging scene! Get yourself an account girl...you have a lot to great experiences/opinions to contribute! :)

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  11. I read the Have you filled your bucket? story too! Our teacher study group read the Ruby Payne book and studied it. It was really nice to talk to other teachers about the book through the book study.

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    1. If you work with any families/children in poverty Ruby Payne's book is a must read! We did it as a book study at our school also.

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  12. I use the clip chart where they can move up and down. Last year was the first time I used it and I loved it. I have read all the debates about behavior systems and rewards and bribery. But what it boils down to is what works best for you and your class. I need someway to keep track of behavior. The clip cart works best for me. I loved that they can move up and change their behavior. It really helped turn around some students. I've had challenging classes and last year was the first time I really had a great group of kids without too many challenges. I also used the bucket fillers this past year. I didn't use it as much as I would have liked and hope to do more with it next year. Good luck. Find what works for you.
    Ms. Kerri and her Krazy Kindergarten

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    1. I couldn't agree more...we are all so different and things work for us that wouldn't/don't work for others! Thanks for leaving the comment!

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  13. I am just stopping by to let you know I nominated you for an award! Head on over to my blog to receive it!
    Dani Patterson
    Patterson's Porch

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  14. I have experienced students as you discuss. After 3 years of struggling with a clip chart type system where the students never seemed to learn from the consequences and I had a hard time holding them responsible for their actions, I adopted Whole Brain Teaching's suggestions (at the time, called Power Teaching). I was really tired of being kicked, hit, things thrown at me, one student tried to stab me with child scissors (he cut my shirt and would have gotten my bra if it wasn't for my underwire). I was desperate. I was lucky enough to attend several of their trainings because I live so close, but their stuff is available on their website for free. You just need to create a user name and password. You can also see some sample videos. Anyway, here's a quick description of some of what I do:

    I always start the day with the rules. We never stop practicing the rules. When we come back from recess, we recite the rules again. Anytime we re-enter our learning environment, we recite the rules. To hold students accountable for the rules, I have one of those behavior pocket charts with one pocket for each student. I have mini copies of my rule posters, about 2x3, (my rules were adapted from Whole Brain Teaching). They rest at the top of the pocket chart where the title is supposed to be. Students start the day with nothing in their pocket. If a rule is broken, I put the rule card in that students' pocket. They have to practice that rule during recess. If we already had recess, I usually have them do it the next day, but it could be during a special event where that child has to sit out. I have a note that is simple that I send home for the parents to read and sign. It asks for the parents to please discuss our class rules with their child. In fact, it has the miniposters of my class rules listed on it - the same pictures that the students see all day long. I simply circle which rule they broke and write the date and the student's name on it. If there is time, I will provide a little description of what happened, i.e. "hitting". The student must bring the note back the next day, or the rule card sits in their pocket until it comes back. They keep missing recess. I really don't have a problem getting the note back. I usually send a 2nd note home if I don't get the note back the first day, and I might call, if necessary. Ever since I started using this system, I see students who have extreme behaviors start to adapt to our learning environment much quicker than before. The students will also discuss with me certain things that they see outside the classroom. For example, they will say, "I saw Luke from Mrs. E's class dump his trash on the floor. That's not showing respect (rule #1) to the Earth." Or they will say, "Nadia from Mrs. K's class cut in line at recess to use the scooter. She wasn't making good decisions." Or sometimes, "Kelly helped me clean up the puzzle I was using. She was helping me follow directions quickly (rule 4) and showing respect." For students who do super things, I have a special rule card that is purple that says "WOO!" on it. It is also from Whole Brain Teaching. I put those in the student's pocket as a reward. I created labels that have purple print that say, "Let's Celebrate! I got a Woo card today." This way parents hear those positives as well as negatives when they pick up a students from school. We have half day kinder, and we don't have any specials or breaks away from our class the entire time they are in school, so I can't stop to write things down. My stuff has to be quick without much effort from me, and this works for me.

    Good luck to you!

    Caring4kinders.blogspot.com

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    1. Suzanne- thanks for leaving the comment about what works for you! I love the idea of repeating the rules often. Kids need that repetition and consistency. I'm going to look into the rules you talked about for Whole Brain Teaching. Thank you so much for the tip!

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  15. I have nominated you and your wonderful blog for the Versatile Blogger and One Lovely Blog Award! Stop by to get the rules!
    Love, Laugh, and Learn

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  16. intelligent description!! keep writing this awesome stuff
    my webpage > mission tx homes

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  17. I am so glad that I found your blog. You have such great ideas. Thank you so much for posting all of the books to use with classroom management.I am looking forward to following you. I would love for you to stop by my blog sometime!

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  18. Hi! Love your blog!
    This is a very tricky question and you are correct, there seems to be no middle ground. People are either for the chart or against the chart.

    I use the chart and believe in the power of the chart. Even in kindergarten, kiddos need to be aware of the choices they make and the consequences that go along with them.
    Like a lot of your other posters, our school has a system in place that uses the chart. I think that even if my school did not have a system using the chart, I still would.
    I just try and be sure not to make it a belittling experience with my words and tone.

    What are you leaning towards?


    Kristen
    I do, We Do, You Do!


    PS - We also use the "Pond of Choice" and my Kinders love it!

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    1. Thanks for the nice compliment and thanks for your input! I just love hearing what everyone else thinks!

      I'll probably keep a chart. It works for me because I'm a visual organizer. I like the idea of letting the kids move back up if behavior improves and keeping the chart in a less "public" place so I'll probably try that this year.

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  19. I have given you an award! Stop by my blog to check it out!!

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  20. Love your blog!
    I too had a really rough year with behavior issues. I have been teaching for 19 years, I have taught 5th, 2nd, 1st, and I currently teach kindergarten which I love. I even teach during the summer. I teach grammar and vocabulary to 6th and 7th graders.
    This last school year in kinder was really hard. I too ran after children who decided it was ok to leave the room and our yard. I would end up in the office practically having a heart attack at the end of my sprint. I was kicked, bitten, punched in the face. It got so bad that the principal was sending me any extra adults that were available during the day so I could teach and they could remove the multitude of issues. I use the chart and for this class it worked a while, then for those who had the issues it did not work at all. It started finally working a little better when I started the day with everyone on the highest level then it was up to them to keep it there.
    I feel for you and your situation. I can only hope that this coming year will be better. I believe it cannot be any worse. Enjoy the rest of your summer.
    Laura

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    1. Oh my....you are one busy lady! Thank you for sharing your challenging behavior story! It's so nice to know we are all entering this "challenging behavior" journey together. And I'm hanging my hopes on "it can only get better!"

      By the way...checked out your blog...the teacher tool belts are adorable!

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  21. When I went to Kindergarten last year, I asked a friend for advice. She told me: "Teacher Pay Teachers" and "google Kindergarten blogs". One blog I found that made sense to me on this issue of discipline was Fairydust Teaching. Two specific posts for this discussion:

    http://fairydustteaching.blogspot.com/2012/06/rewards-vs-bribes-whats-difference.html

    and

    http://fairydustteaching.blogspot.com/2011/01/no-more-green-light-yellow-light-red.html

    There are other postings if you look under her "labels" list for classroom management. hope this helps!

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  22. I like to show the kids a diagram on the white board. Several x's in a clump and one way on the outside. I tell the kids that when they misbehave they are on the outside of the group. If they want to come back and join us they have to do what we are doing. It works!

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  23. I have a chart- all children start their day on green. They 'bump' their number (no names) up or down according to their behavior. If they get to purple they get a note that says "I've had a great day, I made it to purple!" I have these notes made on a sheet of labels so that I can stick it on a fun note pad paper and they can share it when they get home. I also have a class reward this year, that if everyone stays on green or above that we get to add a piece to our puzzle (last month it was making a gingerbread man, this month we're putting together a snowman) When our 'puzzle' is complete we have a celebration- gingerbread man video (that was the Dec theme), principal reads a story... something simple- and takes no more than 10 minutes.
    I do have a kiddo that doesn't care about the chart or colors- and so he has an individual plan- earning chips/cotton balls/buttons throughout the day (Sam, Thank you for sitting on your bottom, take a cotton ball), when his container is full he can make something with it to take home.

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  24. I am about to teach first grade for the first time, I have taught all other primary school grades. So I came across your blog while looking for ideas. I admit I havent read all of the above, however I was at a conference a few years ago and the topic was behaviour management. Whilst their idea of behaviour management was similar to your chart ie levels that children move between. For younger children they recommended a circle (no sharp corners) in the particular colour they had moved to was given to them. From what I remember this was primarily for those who moved down levels. Giving them a tactile object they said reminded the child constantly at their desk that they needed to think of their behaviour and also made the teacher concentrate on observing that child/ren and swapping the colour when the child made a better choice. Just food for thought with little ones :)
    Will have to put this as anonymous because I don't have any of the other profiles

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  25. Hi teachers! Love this topic! Such interesting opinions. I'm a huge fan of the whole brain teaching rules - we recite them every morning with gestures! Whenever a classroom rule is being broken I LOVE that I can say "What's rule #2?" and my whole class can repeat it back to me. It's clear and short - perfect for Kinders.

    My school has "banned" clip / card systems because of their public nature. I never liked the idea of a parent/teacher/volunteer walking into my room and making an assumption about a child based on their color/clip position.

    Now here's where I want to post something...controversial. While I don't like a wall mounted display, I'm not ENTIRELY opposed to a little embarrassment as a means of correcting behavior. Wait! Don't boo me yet - hear me out! I might be a little old school in my thinking but often a quick moment of embarrassment address and solves behavioral problems. For example, one of my top kiddos interrupts me CONSTANTLY. One on one, small group, whole group...doesn't matter. He finds it impossible to keep his thoughts in his head. We've discussed the issue together, decided on alternatives, even read a Julia Cook book, but nothing was helping. Last week during whole group instruction, he blurted out "MY dog got sick last night!" In a neutral voice I said, "Oh no! You've interrupted my instructions and that's not okay. Please apologize to your class for wasting time." He lowered his head and told the class he was sorry. Embarrassing? Yes. Soul crushing, life ruining, self esteem breaking? No. And we have not had that issue since!

    Again, I LOVE my students and I'm not some monster who seeks out opportunities to harass Kinders. But I do think embarrassment serves as a natural and sometimes effective consequence. Thoughts?

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  26. My child's school uses this and I think it is humiliating to children. To walk up to the front of the class and move your clip down is horrible. My son use to like the color red and now hates it. For a child to gage their success of the school day by a color is idiotic. I have seen how moving up makes him happy and how when his clip is moved down he is emotionally devastated. Mainly this is used as a form of humiliation because anyone who walks into that classroom can judge your child. I work with pre-k and there are many different ways to positively change a child's behavior without humiliation.

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  27. Hi, I love your blog, I'm an English teacher from Guatemala. I'm working right now in a pictionary with diferents topics, like (school objectc, fruits and vegetables, professions, vacations, adjectives, body parts, etc)so I would like to ask you if you can share with me the font that you are using in your blog cause I really like it so much, I will appreciate if you can do it, thank you and congratulations with your blog cause is awesome and also very helpful.

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  28. My children's school began using the clip chart this year and I am NOT happy. I actually came across your blog looking for actual research done on this topic. I have been searching for two months and have found NO study that supports the use of the clip system. I will say that in my one child's class I had a talk with the teacher, have been observing the class when I am in there ... and have found that it is fair. In my other child's class it is not fair at all. Child get their clip moved up for basically being (for lack of a better word ...) brown-nosers. The kids who are shy and quiet and do their work get nothing, boys who have a little energy never move their clip up. But several girls who are sneaky, smart, and know how to use the system make enough of a show to get the teacher to move their clips up for rewards. As a result myself and other parents in the room have to deal with very disappointed children who are trying to please the teacher, but can not attain her approval. I am just waiting for them to give up and the behavior to escalate. If there is indeed scientific research that shows this is a PROVEN strategy then please let me know. But since it appears to just be something every teacher is finding on pinterest, I think it should be reexamined. I am not saying it might not be a good strategy, but it is a difficult strategy to implement. And if not done properly it impacts a teacher's relationship with her students (and the parents) as well as the children's future behaviors and self esteem. It also creates children who think it is okay to look for praise and do anything to get it (this time from the teacher, but in the future it could be peers ... yikes!)

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    1. I can see your point. I quit using the system myself because I had a hard time remember to move their pictures (I used pictures instead of clips) up...I just literally got too busy teaching to remember to reward every kid individually. I had parents complain at conferences that their child felt "bad" that I never moved their pictures up.

      This year I'm using a class rewards system and table reward system to encourage my class to work together as a class to earn rewards/make good choices. I still need a system in place to warn students who are starting to make the wrong choices so I switched my system. Click here to check it out: http://inspiredbykindergarten.blogspot.com/search/label/Behavior%20Management

      I like this a lot better and find that after about the first month of school I rarely have to use the system because kids understand what is expected of them in class. The work hard for class/table awards and I feel like it helps all the students feel they are working together to make our classroom run smoothly.

      It's important to me that we are a team and that we all play a part in creating a classroom where everyone feels safe, loved and successful.

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